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Reno Omokri tables the current #issues of #Arabic Inscription on #Naira Note

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The inscription on our naira note has been something most people see every single day, but never take note of it. While we very much agree that there is a significant number of Nigerians who are Muslims, it however makes a little or note clarification why Arabic is on out currency when we are not Arabians.

from @renoomokri – Much Ado About Arabic on Naira Notes and Nigerian Army Flag (Part 1)

By Reno Omokri
Recently, a lawyer sued the Federal Government on the issue of Arabic inscriptions on our currency and on the Nigerian Army’s logo.


The fellow, Malcolm Omirhobo, wants the Federal High Court to declare as “illegal, unlawful, and unconstitutional to allow the Nigerian Army logo to be adorned, and inscribed in Arabic language, instead of the official English language or Hausa, Yoruba and Igbo which are the three main languages or ethnic groups in Nigeria.” I see this as a function of ignorance, and I will explain. Hausa, Yoruba and Igbo are all spoken languages. None of them are written languages, although there does exist some limited form of writing among a few Nigerian tribes.

The Hausa people adapted Arabic into the ajami script, and the Igbo have an ancient pictogram writing style called Nsibidi that is entirely indigenous to them and was developed without any outside influence. But both these scripts are insufficient for modern writing, except they are developed, and we have yet to develop them.


Now, both Arabic and Roman scripts are foreign to Nigeria. We must understand that Arabic does not mean Muslim, and Roman does not mean Christian. To, therefore, go to court to seek an order rejecting Arabic on our Naira notes and on any of our national emblems is actually silly. You might as well ask the courts also to outlaw Roman script.


There are Arabian Christians who have used the Arabic script since before Islam even existed. Waraka ibn Nawfal, the man that prophet Mohammed went to after he had his revelation, was a Christian priest, and he taught and wrote Scripture in Arabic.


Mr. Omirhobo’s case would only make sense if the inscriptions were an Arabic script conveying an Islamic message, but thank God that that is certainly not the case.


The Arabic Script on Naira notes has nothing to do with Islam. They only indicate the denomination of the Naira note in question. And the Arabic script on the Nigerian Army’s logo represents their motto. It does not carry an Islamic message.

So, why do we have Arabic scripts on our currency and on the emblems of some of our na .

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Much Ado About Arabic on Naira Notes and Nigerian Army Flag (Part 1) By Reno Omokri Recently, a lawyer sued the Federal Government on the issue of Arabic inscriptions on our currency and on the Nigerian Army’s logo. The fellow, Malcolm Omirhobo, wants the Federal High Court to declare as “illegal, unlawful, and unconstitutional to allow the Nigerian Army logo to be adorned, and inscribed in Arabic language, instead of the official English language or Hausa, Yoruba and Igbo which are the three main languages or ethnic groups in Nigeria.” I see this as a function of ignorance, and I will explain. Hausa, Yoruba and Igbo are all spoken languages. None of them are written languages, although there does exist some limited form of writing among a few Nigerian tribes. The Hausa people adapted Arabic into the ajami script, and the Igbo have an ancient pictogram writing style called Nsibidi that is entirely indigenous to them and was developed without any outside influence. But both these scripts are insufficient for modern writing, except they are developed, and we have yet to develop them. Now, both Arabic and Roman scripts are foreign to Nigeria. We must understand that Arabic does not mean Muslim, and Roman does not mean Christian. To, therefore, go to court to seek an order rejecting Arabic on our Naira notes and on any of our national emblems is actually silly. You might as well ask the courts also to outlaw Roman script. There are Arabian Christians who have used the Arabic script since before Islam even existed. Waraka ibn Nawfal, the man that prophet Mohammed went to after he had his revelation, was a Christian priest, and he taught and wrote Scripture in Arabic. Mr. Omirhobo’s case would only make sense if the inscriptions were an Arabic script conveying an Islamic message, but thank God that that is certainly not the case. The Arabic Script on Naira notes has nothing to do with Islam. They only indicate the denomination of the Naira note in question. And the Arabic script on the Nigerian Army’s logo represents their motto. It does not carry an Islamic message. So, why do we have Arabic scripts on our currency and on the emblems of some of our na

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Oby Oriji

The author Oby Oriji

I am a 5'7" tall extrovert Igbo girl with restless hands. An obsessed writer, and the reason we are here. Email : Oriji.oby@gmail.com dealspotr.com
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